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Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.


Complete List of Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program Courses

This is a list of all courses the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program has offered. While most of these courses are taught every year, a few are not. Please contact the program for more information on courses not offered in a given term.

WRT 101 EAPP COMMUNICATION ACROSS CONTEXTS I

This course is designed to help undergraduate non-native speakers of English improve their English oral communication and listening skills in preparation for social interactions at the university. Students will practice speaking at greater length and faster speed by developing fluency, grammatical accuracy, complexity of sentence structures, and vocabulary. In addition, students will practice listening actively to peers, summarizing, paraphrasing, and repeating key information from native speakers of English. The course will also cover such techniques as asking follow-up questions, using socialization strategies, adapting to cultural differences, practicing small talk, and making formal and informal introductions. Class work will take place in and out of the classroom with the collaboration of native and non-native speakers of English in formal and informal settings. Significant class time will be devoted to English pronunciation.

Prerequisites: A C or better in WRT 101: EAPP Communication across Contexts I is required to proceed to WRT 102: EAPP Communication across Contexts II. EAPP Program permission required for non-EAPP Program students.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 102 EAPP COMMUNICATION ACROSS CONTEXTS II

This course builds upon the lessons from WRT 101: EAPP Communication across Contexts I, and it is designed to help undergraduate non-native speakers of English improve their English oral communication and listening skills in preparation for academic and social interactions. Students will practice taking notes, summarizing, repeating, and critiquing key information from recorded lectures and presentations – with an emphasis on the discourse most prevalent in undergraduate university courses. Students will also practice communicating in different academic, social, and cultural contexts as they engage in classroom conversation, debates, interviews, speaking to formal audiences, and giving academic presentations in English. Class work will take place in and out of the classroom with the collaboration of native and non-native speakers of English in formal and informal settings.

Prerequisites: C or better in WRT 101: EAPP Communication across Contexts I, or permission of EAPP Program for non-EAPP Program students. WRT 102 is an integrated course that supports WRT 104: EAPP Research, Reading, and Writing coursework.
Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 103 EAPP CRITICAL READING, REASONING, AND WRITING

WRT 103 is an introduction to critical reading and writing skills. Lessons will center on the analysis of varied readings and on using writing as a tool for critical thinking and reflection. Students will be introduced to concepts of rhetorical analysis and the use of logic, as well as the roles of audience and purpose in shaping the organization, style and argumentative strategies of their own papers. In addition, students will build writing fluency and self-expression through freewriting and in-class writing. Collaboration is an important part of learning; therefore, students will work together as they learn to critique their own work and the work of their peers. Attention will be given to writing beyond the classroom, such as communicating with faculty and others campus programs and departments.

Prerequisites: A C or better is required to proceed to WRT 104, EAPP Research, Reading, and Writing. EAPP Program permission required for non-EAPP Program students.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 104 EAPP RESEARCH, READING, AND WRITING

WRT 104 extends the critical reading and writing skills learned in WRT 103: EAPP Critical Reading, Reasoning, and Writing to the act of research. Research may include traditional library sources and academic journals, but it may also include primary research such as fieldwork, surveys, and interviews. A variety of texts will be analyzed and discussed in preparation for constructing extended argumentative essays and a final argumentative research paper. Reading and responding critically to texts will be practiced. Students will learn to incorporate source material into research writing and integrate one's ideas with those from other texts. Collaboration is an important part of learning; therefore, students will work together as they learn to critique their work and the work of peers. Attention will be given to writing beyond the classroom, such as communicating with faculty and staff across the college.

Prerequisites: C or better in WRT 103: EAPP Critical Reading, Research, and Writing, or permission of EAPP Program for non-EAPP Program students.
Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 105 REASONING AND WRITING IN THE COLLEGE

Introduces disciplinary writing at the college level by offering instruction in small sections that focus on the act of writing. Provides instruction and practice in clear and effective writing and in constructing cogent and compelling arguments, as students draft and revise numerous papers of different forms and lengths. These papers introduce some of the forms of writing students are expected to produce later in their college careers as well as in their public and professional lives after graduation. The subject of the course is writing, but since writing is about something, each section presents various texts, mostly written, for analysis and discussion in preparation for constructing extended argumentative essays and a final argumentative research paper. Students consider the roles of audience and purpose in shaping the organization, style, and argumentative strategies of their own papers, while they learn to become critical readers of their writing through peer feedback and revision/editing workshops.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 105A REASONING AND WRITING IN THE COLLEGE: FIRST COURSE IN WRT 105A-WRT 105B SEQUENCE

WRT 105A (Fall) and WRT 105B (Spring) distribute the work of WRT 105E across two semesters, with WRT 105A covering the first half of WRT 105E. WRT 105A immerses students in the experience of academic writing, with a particular emphasis on analyzing, using, and documenting scholarly and non-scholarly texts. It provides instruction and practice in constructing cogent and compelling arguments, as students draft and revise two short argumentative essays. Students will develop and test their ideas through discussion, informal writing, peer critiques and self-assessments. All sections of WRT 105A&B revolve around a theme and include a weekly writing group in which students do the work of writing with immediate support from the course instructor. To proceed from WRT 105A to WRT 105B, students must earn a grade of “C” or higher.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 105B REASONING AND WRITING IN THE COLLEGE: SECND PART OF THE WRT 105A-WRT 105B SEQUENCE

The second-half of the WRT 105A-WRT 105B sequence, WRT 105B immerses students in the experience of academic writing, with a particular emphasis on analyzing, using, and documenting scholarly and non-scholarly texts. It provides instruction and practice in constructing cogent and compelling arguments, as students draft and revise a proposal and an 8-10 page argumentative research paper. Students will develop and test their ideas through discussion, informal writing, peer critiques and self-assessments. All sections of WRT 105A&B revolve around a theme and include a weekly writing group in which students do the work of writing with immediate support from the course instructor. WRT 105B students who have worked diligently but have not attained a grade of “B-“ or higher may take an incomplete and sign up for the Extension, a weekly workshop and tutorial program that allows students to continue working on their writing, raise their final grades, and satisfy the Primary Writing Requirement.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 105E REASONING AND WRITING IN THE COLLEGE

WRT 105E is an extended version of Reasoning and Writing in the College. While WRT 105 and WRT 105E have the same demands and criteria for completion, WRT 105E is intended for students who decide that they need a more supported writing experience to meet the demands of college writing. All sections of WRT 105E include an additional class session each week and are taught in computer labs and limited to 10 students. WRT 105E students who have worked diligently but have not attained a "B-" or higher may take an incomplete and sign up for the WRT 105E Extension, a weekly workshop and tutorial that allows students to raise their final grades and satisfy the Primary Writing Requirement.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 108 WORKSHOP IN WRITING

Offers ongoing practice and instruction in writing and critiquing writing. Students meet weekly with a writing center consultant to work on forms of academic writing relevant to their spring coursework. These forms may include summaries, critical responses, argumentative essays, and lab reports, among others. Students may also choose to revise essays completed in previous semesters or work on other non-fiction projects. Guided by a writing center consultant, students plan, draft and revise their writing, critique each other's work, assess their own writing, and participate in group session on common writing issues. The semester's work will culminate in a final portfolio that features polished essays and an overall self-assessment.

Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the primary writing requirement.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 245 ADVANCED WRITING & PEER TUTORING

Prepares sophomores, juniors, and seniors enrolled in five-year programs, from the humanities, sciences, and the social sciences for work as writing fellows. Course design facilitates the development of a strong, intuitive writer and speaker in order to become a successful reader, listener and responder in peer-tutoring situations. Ample writing and rewriting experiences, practice in informal and formal speaking, and the critical reading of published essays and student work enhance students' ability to become conscious, flexible communicators. Before tutoring on their own, students observe writing fellows and writing center consultants conduct tutoring sessions. On completion of the course with a B or better, fellows should be prepared to accept their own hours as peer tutors.

Prerequisites: Interested students must apply. Minimum GPA of 3.0.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 247 SPOKEN COMMUNICATION AND PEER TUTORING

Prepares selected sophomores, juniors, and eligible first-year students for work as Speaking Fellows. This course focuses not only on the skill of public speaking, but also on peer tutoring and assisting students with their own forms of spoken communication. In this course, we will examine various components of presentations, including effective use of visual aids and professional delivery styles. We will also explore several types of spoken communication for different purposes and audiences, including argumentative and descriptive speeches, interviews, and group presentations. Through analyzing, studying the construction of, and creating and delivering their own presentations, students will improve their own speaking styles and develop the skills necessary to aid their peers in constructing and revising presentations. By the end of the semester, students should be ready to take on their own hours as peer tutors. This course satisfies a requirement for the Citation for Achievement in College Leadership.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 250 MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

This course is a comprehensive review of the grammar of Modern Standard English. The course will be of interest to those who wish to sharpen their language skills, or to know more about the workings of the English language whether for practical, cognitive or creative ends. Drawing on work in mostly pre-theoretical, descriptive linguistics this course reveals the mechanics of Standard English structure, with occasional detours into the finesse of usage across registers (dialect to slang). Students will learn to develop the ability to see patterns in grammar, as well as its structural possibilities and limits. Assignments will regularly involve reflection on form, usage and speaker judgments. Through a final project, students will investigate some aspect of an English variety available to them. Throughout, students will be working with their data samples of English to explore how speaker choices lead to particular grammatical structures or yield ungrammaticality. Background in linguistics or grammar not needed.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

WRT 251 THE RHETORICAL SENTENCE

Drawing on work in linguistics and rhetorical grammar (e.g., Halliday, Biber, Kolln, Hyland), this course investigates the sentence—its structure, its potential, and its limits in creating meaning. Students will learn about the form and function of “the sentence” and its parts, develop the ability to see patterns and possibilities within and across sentences, and create and analyze sentences of wildly different shapes. Assignments will regularly involve meaningful play with sentences. Through a final project, students will investigate some aspect of the sentence in extended discourse or discuss how knowledge of the sentence might be meaningfully integrated into a writing curriculum. This course is ideal for those interested in writing, writing education, or editing. Background in linguistics or grammar is not necessary. Open to undergraduates and graduate students.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

WRT 252 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF COPYEDITING

While the term “copyediting” may be associated with journalism or literary fiction, in fact it is a vital component of the publication of almost any textual materials—from scholarly and popular publishing in arts and sciences to corporate and technical communications. So what do copy editors do? Is copyediting simply about enforcing rules of correctness? When is it okay to break those rules, or to allow others to do so, and what guides such decisions? How do copy editors understand and negotiate the relationships and interests of readers, writers, and the publications they work for? How has the information age changed the way copy editors think about and approach textual editing? In this class we will address both the principles and practices of copyediting. Students will learn the principles that guide copy editors, and then put these principles into use in a workshop setting, practicing copyediting in a variety of contexts, including digital communications.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement.
Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 261 WRITING IN A DIGITAL WORLD

The purpose of writing in a digital world is to engage with a broader community around a topic of interest and contribute to public knowledge. In this course, students are invited to dig deeply into a question of interest, write for a public audience, and use the Internet as an archive of information waiting to be discovered, analyzed, and written about. Students can draw on pre-existing research interests from their majors or develop a line of inquiry stemming from class discussions, writing, and research. In order to gain experience writing to a range of readers, students will engage in a writing process informed by peer review, self-assessment, and revision. Shorter writing assignments will help students develop and refine ideas as they transform texts for different audiences. The final research project will be multimodal, published for a public audience, and should demonstrate your ability to think critically about a topic and effectively communicate that knowledge to a range of readers.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 262 READING AND WRITING ABOUT RESEARCH IN THE SOCIAL, NATURAL, AND APPLIED SCIENCES

Drawing on the concepts of discourse community and rhetorical genre analysis (e.g., Bazerman, Berkenhotter & Huckin, Swales), this course investigates ways of understanding the choices writers make when communicating about the sciences, with the goal of better understanding how to read and write as an ‘insider’ in your chosen discipline. You will develop a technical vocabulary and set of skills that allow you to identify and describe recurring patterns and describe writer choices within those patterns. Using these tools, you will investigate how writers convey meaning in different disciplinary situations and why they make the writing choices that they do in order to convey meaning. Through a final research project of your choice, you will practice using what you have learned to communicate the results of your own research.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 263 TRANSLATION: INTERPRETING & ADAPTING

This writing studies course counts toward the Citation in Community-Engaged Scholarship. Interdisciplinary and team problem-solving by design, the course investigates a range of potentially high-stakes translation cases involving textual, audiovisual, and multimodal renditions of a source work into a target work. These may include translating an ad or museum label; subtitling a TED Talk or foreign-language stage production; dubbing in anime or games; recasting research procedure in video; or mediated interpreting as in ethnographic studies, business meetings, or medical settings. Course readings and informal translations will support students in learning how a given situation affects the choices and strategies that translators use to maintain the viability of their work. Based on their earlier informal exercises and interests, students will work in teams and with our community partners in the 19th Ward to create final projects that provide meaningful extensions of course learning to real-world issues.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 264 DIGITAL PORTFOLIO

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 265 WRITING ACROSS DISCIPLINES: ARGUMENT AND EVIDENCE

In this course, students will examine three central questions: what is argument, what is evidence, and what is unique about different forms of disciplinary inquiry. The purpose of this course is to examine how argument is enacted in different contexts and how that affects our understanding of evidence. We will begin by looking at traditional philosophical conceptions of argument, and use this understanding as a basis for comparison of how arguments are developed and supported in different academic disciplines. We will also think about how argument is manifested in different divisions of academic inquiry such as the humanities and social sciences. For instance, we might ask if history falls within the humanities or social sciences and why, or how the digitization of the humanities is affecting humanistic conceptions of argument and evidence. Students will be encouraged to investigate writing from several disciplinary perspectives of their choice as a means to investigate these questions.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 272 BIOLOGY: COMMUNICATING YOUR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY

This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester’s end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today’s competitive environment. The class can be used to fulfill 1 of the 2 required Upper-Level Writing experiences in biology, and is suitable for junior and senior year biology majors; all others require permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 273 ENGINEERING: COMMUNICATING YOUR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY

This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester’s end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today’s competitive environment. This course is suitable for second-semester sophomores, juniors and first-semester seniors in the Hajim School; all others require permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 274 PSYCHOLOGY: COMMUNICATING YOUR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY

This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester’s end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today’s competitive environment. The class can be used to fulfill 1 of 2 required Upper-Level Writing experiences in psychology, and is suitable for junior and senior psychology majors; all others require instructor permission.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 275 MATHEMATICS: COMMUNICATING YOUR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY

This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester’s end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today’s competitive environment. This course is suitable for second-semester sophomores, juniors and first-semester seniors; all others require permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement.
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 276 POLITICAL SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: COMMUNICATING YOUR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY

Two-credit course. Cannot be used to satisfy any requirements for the major or minor in Political Science or International Relations. This interactive course teaches “real life” communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, and online profiles. Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester’s end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today’s competitive environment. This course is suitable for second-semester sophomores through first-semester seniors; all others require permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement
Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 277 COMMUNICATING YOUR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY (CROSS DISCIPLINARY)

This interactive course teaches “real life” communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester’s end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today’s competitive environment. This course is suitable for second-semester sophomores, juniors and first-semester seniors; all others require permission of the instructor. All majors welcome.

Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement
Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 281 WRITING STUDIES WORKSHOP

This course is designed for students who wish to pursue research in writing studies; it provides trained writing and speaking fellows with an opportunity to carry out research projects relevant to their interests in writing pedagogy, writing and speaking center theory and practice, or topics related to program development. Students may pursue a new research question or extend an earlier investigation; student research will be complemented by readings on quantitative and qualitative methods. Weekly group meetings will guide students through the process of shaping a research project, identifying fitting methods to address research questions, and analyzing and reporting research effectively for the intended purpose and audience. Individualized feedback and guidance will support students as they (individually or in groups) develop projects that will contribute to the shared knowledge of the field. The aim is for students to produce work that may be shared at a conference and/or submitted for publication.

Prerequisites: Completion of the PWR and either WRT 245/ENG 285 or WRT 247, or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

WRT 394 INTERNSHIP

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2012

WRT 395 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2018

WRT 396 RESEARCH PAPER WRITING IN BIOLOGY

This course will guide students through the process of developing, revising, and presenting a data-driven research write-up. Through writing and speaking exercises, students will learn how to write and speak in a manner appropriate to one’s discipline and audience, obtain feedback from the scientific community, and revise work at each stage of the writing process. It is strongly recommended or required (depending on track) for students writing a senior thesis, but suitable for anyone who plans to pursue research in either basic science or medicine. Open to all Biology-track majors; all others require permission of the instructor. This course meets weekly, and fulfills one of the two ULW requirements. Students cannot use both 395W and 396W for ULW credit.

Last Offered: Spring 2017