Writing, Speaking,
and Argument Program

Faculty

Liz Tinelli, Ph.D.

Lecturer in Writing, EAPP
Graduate Writing Project Co-Coordinator
Ph.D.

(585) 276-5279
liz.tinelli@rochester.edu

Office Hours: By appointment

Curriculum Vitae

Biography

Liz Tinelli is a lecturer for the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program, co-coordinator of the Graduate Writing Project, and a PhD candidate at the Warner School of Education. Her undergraduate writing courses have focused on the use of social media and digital composition as a means to redress social injustice. More recently, class topics have included comedy and culture, and the role celebrities play in constructing societal norms. Her dissertation research examines the composing processes of first-year students, and seeks to overturn the deficit notions of composition students, namely that they “can’t write”, using a theory of literacy as social practice to highlight the complex rhetorical moves that students make during the composing process. She also works closely with Rachel Lee to design programmatic writing support for graduate students of the Arts, Sciences, and Engineering.

Selected Honors, Fellowships, and Professional Activities

  • Breadth Fellowship. Reasoning and Writing in the College. 2009-2011
  • College Teaching, Learning and Technology Roundtable Grant. Utilizing Collaborative Technologies to Support Student Learning in Writing. 2010-2011

Courses Offered (subject to change)

  • EDU 498  Literacy Learning as Social Practice
  • WRT 105  Reasoning and Writing in the College
  • WRT 103  Critical Reading, Reasoning, and Writing
  • WRT 104  Research, Reading, and Writing
  • WRT 101/102  English for Academic Purposes, Speaking and Listening
  • WRT 108  Workshop in Writing

Selected Publications

  • Luehmann, A. & Tinelli, L. (2008). Teacher professional identity development with social networking technologies: Learning reform through blogging. Educational Media International 45(4), 323-333.
  • Luehmann, A. & Tinelli, L. (2011). Supporting practicing science teachers’ growth: The case of blogging in an action research seminar. In A. Luehmann & R. Borassi (Eds.), Blogging as Change: Transforming Education Through New Media Literacies. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.
  • Luehmann, A., Henderson, J., & Tinelli, L. (2013). Supporting Pre-Service Teachers’ Development: The Place of Blogging in the Get Real! Science Teacher Preparation Program. In C. Lankshear, & M. Knobel (Eds.) A New Literacies Sampler.